As reported in the report of the European Commission, Directorate General for Communication, Information for Citizens on Transport Policy [1], the solutions to reduce non renewable primary energy resources consumption and global emissions in the automotive sector are the use of alternative fuels (in particular the use of more clean fossil fuels and biofuels), and new traction systems. The short, medium and long term solutions go towards a progressive electrification of the vehicle towards fully electric vehicles, type BEV (Battery Electric Vehicle). In this context, the hybrid powertrain (HEV - Hybrid Electric Vehicle) represents an evolution of conventional traction systems destined to become increasingly electric. The work presents, through a WTW (Well To Wheel) analysis, the comparison between powertrains with increasing electrification levels: from conventional to pure electric through hybrid. For the type of powertrains considered, the consumption of non-renewable primary energy and CO2 emissions are calculated and compared, based on experimental data on consumption and efficiency of the following vehicles: Toyota Yaris 1500 Petrol, Toyota Auris Diesel (conventional), Toyota Yaris Hybrid, Toyota Prius (HEV) and Nissan Leaf (BEV). Non-renewable primary energy consumption and CO2 emissions have been calculated under real usage conditions; the data were acquired in a road acquisition campaign in Rome on urban, extra-urban and highway routes for a total of 5,400 km and 197 hours of road acquisitions. The results show how the hybrid powertrain achieves significant reductions in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions compared to the conventional powertrain (petrol and diesel). On urban traffic-intensive routes (average speed up to 30 km/h) consumption and emissions are reduced by more than half and are still relevant even on extra-urban routes with average speeds of up to 80 km/h. For higher average speeds (highway, over 100 km/h) consumption and yields tend to be similar. Consumption and emissions of electric powertrains, potentially for consumption and zero emissions, are closely linked to the methods of production and distribution of electricity.

Well to wheel analysis and comparison between conventional, hybrid and electric powertrain in real conditions of use

Ortenzi F.;Genovese A.;Pede G.
2019

Abstract

As reported in the report of the European Commission, Directorate General for Communication, Information for Citizens on Transport Policy [1], the solutions to reduce non renewable primary energy resources consumption and global emissions in the automotive sector are the use of alternative fuels (in particular the use of more clean fossil fuels and biofuels), and new traction systems. The short, medium and long term solutions go towards a progressive electrification of the vehicle towards fully electric vehicles, type BEV (Battery Electric Vehicle). In this context, the hybrid powertrain (HEV - Hybrid Electric Vehicle) represents an evolution of conventional traction systems destined to become increasingly electric. The work presents, through a WTW (Well To Wheel) analysis, the comparison between powertrains with increasing electrification levels: from conventional to pure electric through hybrid. For the type of powertrains considered, the consumption of non-renewable primary energy and CO2 emissions are calculated and compared, based on experimental data on consumption and efficiency of the following vehicles: Toyota Yaris 1500 Petrol, Toyota Auris Diesel (conventional), Toyota Yaris Hybrid, Toyota Prius (HEV) and Nissan Leaf (BEV). Non-renewable primary energy consumption and CO2 emissions have been calculated under real usage conditions; the data were acquired in a road acquisition campaign in Rome on urban, extra-urban and highway routes for a total of 5,400 km and 197 hours of road acquisitions. The results show how the hybrid powertrain achieves significant reductions in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions compared to the conventional powertrain (petrol and diesel). On urban traffic-intensive routes (average speed up to 30 km/h) consumption and emissions are reduced by more than half and are still relevant even on extra-urban routes with average speeds of up to 80 km/h. For higher average speeds (highway, over 100 km/h) consumption and yields tend to be similar. Consumption and emissions of electric powertrains, potentially for consumption and zero emissions, are closely linked to the methods of production and distribution of electricity.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/54075
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