Buildings are the largest energy-consuming sector in the world, accounting for over one third of all carbon emissions. 75–90% of OECD building stock will still be in service by 2050. Yet the performance of most existing buildings is below current standards. Energy efficiency in buildings is a key focus in European and global climate and energy policies. This TRS aims to deliver a structured overview of research activities in this sector. Several results have arisen from R&D on cost-effectiveness and reliability of products and techniques, and from RD&D of “low-energy” and “nearly zero-energy” buildings for penetration in the market. Although progress is being made, deep renovation remains a priority if the potential for substantial savings and multiple related benefits is to be realised. A new approach to energy system integration and the extension of the research at district and community levels (taking in social, ICT, health and environmental issues) have started but still require supplementary developments. In this context storage is assuming a growing role in boosting energy efficiency, integrating renewable energy sources (RESs) and promoting interoperability between systems. The connections between individual buildings and district energy systems should be increasingly strengthened and the potential for flexibility in buildings within smart grids demonstrated, resulting in reduced energy consumption and lower CO2 emissions. Computational tools are necessary to take account of the complexity of buildings during design, assessment and operation. These should be supported by a series of targeted tools and solutions enabling better decision-making, plus education and awareness on available innovative techniques.

Energy Efficiency in Buildings - Thematic Research Summary

ezilda costanzo
2014

Abstract

Buildings are the largest energy-consuming sector in the world, accounting for over one third of all carbon emissions. 75–90% of OECD building stock will still be in service by 2050. Yet the performance of most existing buildings is below current standards. Energy efficiency in buildings is a key focus in European and global climate and energy policies. This TRS aims to deliver a structured overview of research activities in this sector. Several results have arisen from R&D on cost-effectiveness and reliability of products and techniques, and from RD&D of “low-energy” and “nearly zero-energy” buildings for penetration in the market. Although progress is being made, deep renovation remains a priority if the potential for substantial savings and multiple related benefits is to be realised. A new approach to energy system integration and the extension of the research at district and community levels (taking in social, ICT, health and environmental issues) have started but still require supplementary developments. In this context storage is assuming a growing role in boosting energy efficiency, integrating renewable energy sources (RESs) and promoting interoperability between systems. The connections between individual buildings and district energy systems should be increasingly strengthened and the potential for flexibility in buildings within smart grids demonstrated, resulting in reduced energy consumption and lower CO2 emissions. Computational tools are necessary to take account of the complexity of buildings during design, assessment and operation. These should be supported by a series of targeted tools and solutions enabling better decision-making, plus education and awareness on available innovative techniques.
Research, Energy Efficiency, Building, Innovation, EU FP7, Set Plan
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/60661
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