In 2014, the European Environment Agency estimated 59 630 premature deaths in Italy attributable to long-term exposure to PM2.5, 17 290 to NO2 and 2900 to O3. The aim of this study was to test an approach for assessing health impact of the above pollutants analyzing possible associations between annual municipal concentrations, estimated by the national dispersion model developed by ENEA, and mortality rates for trachea, bronchus and lung (TBL) cancer, total respiratory diseases (RD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Tuscany was selected as test case. Methods: For the 287 municipalities, 2009-13 standardized mortality rates (SMRates) for each cause of death were calculated by the ENEA epidemiological database. The SMRates of municipalities, aggregated on the basis of the 2003 or 2010 estimated pollutant concentration tertiles, were also computed. Results: TBL cancer SMRate in municipalities with 2003 PM2.5 levels >15.2 μg/m3 was significantly higher than the SMRates of the two lowest tertiles and COPD SMRates in the two highest O3 tertiles were significantly higher than that of the lower tertile. No association between PM2.5 or NO2 concentrations and RD and COPD was detected. Approximately 625 TBL cancer deaths attributable to PM2.5 levels above 10 μg/m3 in 2003 were estimated in the region. Smoking habits and deprivation index were homogeneously distributed among municipalities. Conclusion: This methodological approach allowed detecting associations between mortality and specific air pollutants even at levels below the Italian normative limits and could be employed to evaluate the potential health impact of air pollution in areas where direct measures of concentration are unavailable.

Impact of modelled PM2.5, NO2 and O3 annual air concentrations on some causes of mortality in Tuscany municipalities

Uccelli R.;Mastrantonio M.;Altavista P.;Pacchierotti F.;Piersanti A.;Ciancarella L.
2019

Abstract

In 2014, the European Environment Agency estimated 59 630 premature deaths in Italy attributable to long-term exposure to PM2.5, 17 290 to NO2 and 2900 to O3. The aim of this study was to test an approach for assessing health impact of the above pollutants analyzing possible associations between annual municipal concentrations, estimated by the national dispersion model developed by ENEA, and mortality rates for trachea, bronchus and lung (TBL) cancer, total respiratory diseases (RD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Tuscany was selected as test case. Methods: For the 287 municipalities, 2009-13 standardized mortality rates (SMRates) for each cause of death were calculated by the ENEA epidemiological database. The SMRates of municipalities, aggregated on the basis of the 2003 or 2010 estimated pollutant concentration tertiles, were also computed. Results: TBL cancer SMRate in municipalities with 2003 PM2.5 levels >15.2 μg/m3 was significantly higher than the SMRates of the two lowest tertiles and COPD SMRates in the two highest O3 tertiles were significantly higher than that of the lower tertile. No association between PM2.5 or NO2 concentrations and RD and COPD was detected. Approximately 625 TBL cancer deaths attributable to PM2.5 levels above 10 μg/m3 in 2003 were estimated in the region. Smoking habits and deprivation index were homogeneously distributed among municipalities. Conclusion: This methodological approach allowed detecting associations between mortality and specific air pollutants even at levels below the Italian normative limits and could be employed to evaluate the potential health impact of air pollution in areas where direct measures of concentration are unavailable.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/51685
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