The pattern and permeability characteristics that compose three-dimensional (3D) textiles are important as a textile shading component to the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. Moreover, due to their complex geometry, 3D fabrics require a detailed modeling for correct evaluation of performance. This paper aims to present and investigate the optical properties of six 3D fabrics proposed as an alternative to traditional roller blind shading systems, which could guarantee high daylight availability and visual comfort. The light transmission distribution for the different samples has been characterized by carrying out angular visual transmittance measurements, using integrating sphere optical benches, and virtual modeling using Radiance's genBSDF tool. The Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Function (BSDF) calculated with Radiance shows a good fit with the optical angular measurements, which were used as a benchmark and to calibrate models. The performance of the 3D textiles, in terms of illuminance, daylight availability, and glare, was assessed considering two of the set of 3D textiles as alternative materials for a movable internal roller shade system in an open office. The innovative system was compared with a traditional single layer fabric roller blind under different shading control strategies, 3D fabrics demonstrate the potential of increasing Daylight Autonomy while providing better uniformity and better connection with the outdoors due to a higher openness factor. The shading effect created by the 3D geometry of the textile can increase the openness factor while restricting glare.

Daylighting performance of three-dimensional textiles

Zinzi M.;
2019

Abstract

The pattern and permeability characteristics that compose three-dimensional (3D) textiles are important as a textile shading component to the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. Moreover, due to their complex geometry, 3D fabrics require a detailed modeling for correct evaluation of performance. This paper aims to present and investigate the optical properties of six 3D fabrics proposed as an alternative to traditional roller blind shading systems, which could guarantee high daylight availability and visual comfort. The light transmission distribution for the different samples has been characterized by carrying out angular visual transmittance measurements, using integrating sphere optical benches, and virtual modeling using Radiance's genBSDF tool. The Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Function (BSDF) calculated with Radiance shows a good fit with the optical angular measurements, which were used as a benchmark and to calibrate models. The performance of the 3D textiles, in terms of illuminance, daylight availability, and glare, was assessed considering two of the set of 3D textiles as alternative materials for a movable internal roller shade system in an open office. The innovative system was compared with a traditional single layer fabric roller blind under different shading control strategies, 3D fabrics demonstrate the potential of increasing Daylight Autonomy while providing better uniformity and better connection with the outdoors due to a higher openness factor. The shading effect created by the 3D geometry of the textile can increase the openness factor while restricting glare.
Alternative shading material; Daylight autonomy; Daylight performance metrics; Innovative blinds; Light performance measurement
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/52573
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