The production of synthetic natural gas from coal and biomass gasification made it possible to obtain a product that can be used to replace easily the standard natural gas in the existing infrastructures. This paper follows and presents a study that was conducted on a synthetic natural gas plant integrated with carbon capture and storage technologies. The recent growth in the use of energy coming from renewable sources requires that balancing measures be taken for electricity grids, which, as can be easily imagined, is best accomplished by using multiple energy storage technologies. In particular, the power-to-gas technology allows renewable electrical energy to be transformed into methane via electrolysis and subsequent methanation. Moreover, the production of synthetic natural gas can be enhanced by using concentrated CO2 emitted by synthetic natural gas plants, coupling the coal gasification and methanation processes within the same plant. This paper compares and evaluates two distinct process configurations and their implementation with power-to-gas technology in Aspen Plus v.8. During the study, it was analyzed how the introduction of carbon capture and storage technologies affect the overall energy balance, as well as the individual performances of each configuration. The two cases proved to have similar efficiency; it was also observed that the integration of and carbon capture and storage technologies resulted in a negligible reduction in the efficiency of the system (approximately 1%). The integration of power-to-gas technologies led to a decrease in the efficiency of the system up to 30%. Based on the current emission allowances specified in the rules of the regulated market of CO2, it was also assessed how such technologies would be sustainable in terms of costs derived from the production of gas. An analysis was in fact performed to estimate the costs associated with this type of plant and the results showed that the introduction of carbon capture and storage technologies in synthetic natural gas plants had a lower impact on the costs related to both the plant and the synthetic natural gas. In this respect, a sensitivity analysis of the most influent factors was performed as well. The results showed that, when it comes to the production of gas in in the power-to-gas process, the specific cost strongly depends on the price of electricity and the operating hours.

Modeling and economic evaluation of carbon capture and storage technologies integrated into synthetic natural gas and power-to-gas plants

Bassano C.;Deiana P.;
2020

Abstract

The production of synthetic natural gas from coal and biomass gasification made it possible to obtain a product that can be used to replace easily the standard natural gas in the existing infrastructures. This paper follows and presents a study that was conducted on a synthetic natural gas plant integrated with carbon capture and storage technologies. The recent growth in the use of energy coming from renewable sources requires that balancing measures be taken for electricity grids, which, as can be easily imagined, is best accomplished by using multiple energy storage technologies. In particular, the power-to-gas technology allows renewable electrical energy to be transformed into methane via electrolysis and subsequent methanation. Moreover, the production of synthetic natural gas can be enhanced by using concentrated CO2 emitted by synthetic natural gas plants, coupling the coal gasification and methanation processes within the same plant. This paper compares and evaluates two distinct process configurations and their implementation with power-to-gas technology in Aspen Plus v.8. During the study, it was analyzed how the introduction of carbon capture and storage technologies affect the overall energy balance, as well as the individual performances of each configuration. The two cases proved to have similar efficiency; it was also observed that the integration of and carbon capture and storage technologies resulted in a negligible reduction in the efficiency of the system (approximately 1%). The integration of power-to-gas technologies led to a decrease in the efficiency of the system up to 30%. Based on the current emission allowances specified in the rules of the regulated market of CO2, it was also assessed how such technologies would be sustainable in terms of costs derived from the production of gas. An analysis was in fact performed to estimate the costs associated with this type of plant and the results showed that the introduction of carbon capture and storage technologies in synthetic natural gas plants had a lower impact on the costs related to both the plant and the synthetic natural gas. In this respect, a sensitivity analysis of the most influent factors was performed as well. The results showed that, when it comes to the production of gas in in the power-to-gas process, the specific cost strongly depends on the price of electricity and the operating hours.
CO; 2; utilization; Economics analysis; Power-to-gas; SNG
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/53035
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