The behaviour of the scrape-off plasma of the projected Italian tokamak I-DTT is analysed by means of the two-dimensional edge code TECXY for either Li or Sn as the liquid target material. A scan in the outer midplane separatrix density range n e,omp ≈ (0.5-1.1) × 1020 m-3 is carried out for several power inputs into the scrape-off layer (SOL) up to a maximum of P SOL = 35 MW. The radiative capability and peak load mitigation are higher for Sn than for Li, but only slightly so at high density, so that the entire density range can be explored with liquid Sn targets, unlike Li whose employment at low density and high power is questionable. However, if a ceiling to the Sn concentration is set for high core fusion performance, Sn mitigation at low density may drop below Li. Nonetheless, concerns about the Li option derive from the very large material consumption and from the fact that the main mechanism of impurity release is sputtering, which is outside the full control of the operator. Considering specifically the three main scenarios-low, medium and high density-at the maximum auxiliary power of 45 MW, operations are successful with Sn, whereas Li requires an additional impurity able to radiate in the core, except at the highest density. The snowflake plus configuration, compared with the standard single null, as a sample for advanced divertors, appears more suited to exploit the advantages of the liquid metal option. Concerning additional impurities, only Ar and Ne are considered at present. They can strongly help in reaching and studying deep detached conditions even at the maximum power, but are not essential for operations. Wide flexibility in designing the target refrigeration system is required to fully exploit its great potential.

Perspectives for the liquid lithium and tin targets in the Italian Divertor Test Tokamak (I-DTT) divertor

Crisanti F.;
2019

Abstract

The behaviour of the scrape-off plasma of the projected Italian tokamak I-DTT is analysed by means of the two-dimensional edge code TECXY for either Li or Sn as the liquid target material. A scan in the outer midplane separatrix density range n e,omp ≈ (0.5-1.1) × 1020 m-3 is carried out for several power inputs into the scrape-off layer (SOL) up to a maximum of P SOL = 35 MW. The radiative capability and peak load mitigation are higher for Sn than for Li, but only slightly so at high density, so that the entire density range can be explored with liquid Sn targets, unlike Li whose employment at low density and high power is questionable. However, if a ceiling to the Sn concentration is set for high core fusion performance, Sn mitigation at low density may drop below Li. Nonetheless, concerns about the Li option derive from the very large material consumption and from the fact that the main mechanism of impurity release is sputtering, which is outside the full control of the operator. Considering specifically the three main scenarios-low, medium and high density-at the maximum auxiliary power of 45 MW, operations are successful with Sn, whereas Li requires an additional impurity able to radiate in the core, except at the highest density. The snowflake plus configuration, compared with the standard single null, as a sample for advanced divertors, appears more suited to exploit the advantages of the liquid metal option. Concerning additional impurities, only Ar and Ne are considered at present. They can strongly help in reaching and studying deep detached conditions even at the maximum power, but are not essential for operations. Wide flexibility in designing the target refrigeration system is required to fully exploit its great potential.
DTT; edge plasma; heat load mitigation; liquid divertor; SOL plasma
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/53607
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