Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of long-term exposure to PM2.5 on residents of Rome, Italy in terms of ischemic heart diseases (IHD), chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), lung cancer (LC), stroke and the number of working days lost (WDL). Methods: In this study, we estimated human health impacts from long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 through application of linear RR and integrated exposure-response (IER) functions and the AirQ + software. Results: In 2014, on average 1189, 348, 43, 301 and 387 cases of IHD, COPD, LC, stroke and WDL, respectively could be avoided in Rome if the annual mean PM2.5 concentration was reduced from 15.6 to 10.0 μg m−3. In 2014, 27.67% of IHD, 15.9% of COPD, 9.5% of LC, 19.9% of stroke as well as 2.5% of WDL are attributed to the long-term exposure to PM2.5 concentrations exceeding 10 μg m−3. Conclusion: This may be achieved through adoption of stringent air pollution regulations and sustainable city planning. Increase in urban green infrastructures and improving road transportation will reduce PM2.5 levels in urban environment, thereby safeguarding human health from air pollution and improving citizens’ well-being.

Long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 and impacts on health in Rome, Italy

De Marco A.;
2019

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of long-term exposure to PM2.5 on residents of Rome, Italy in terms of ischemic heart diseases (IHD), chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), lung cancer (LC), stroke and the number of working days lost (WDL). Methods: In this study, we estimated human health impacts from long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 through application of linear RR and integrated exposure-response (IER) functions and the AirQ + software. Results: In 2014, on average 1189, 348, 43, 301 and 387 cases of IHD, COPD, LC, stroke and WDL, respectively could be avoided in Rome if the annual mean PM2.5 concentration was reduced from 15.6 to 10.0 μg m−3. In 2014, 27.67% of IHD, 15.9% of COPD, 9.5% of LC, 19.9% of stroke as well as 2.5% of WDL are attributed to the long-term exposure to PM2.5 concentrations exceeding 10 μg m−3. Conclusion: This may be achieved through adoption of stringent air pollution regulations and sustainable city planning. Increase in urban green infrastructures and improving road transportation will reduce PM2.5 levels in urban environment, thereby safeguarding human health from air pollution and improving citizens’ well-being.
Air pollution; COPD; Health effect; Ischemic heart disease; PM; 2.5
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/53949
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