Plant diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens have been recognized as a critical factor worldwide for plant health and productivity overall in intensive cropping systems characterized by low organic matter content and frequent soil tillage. Very important goals have been reached in soil microbiota manipulation using organic amendment based on disease-suppressive compost where a specific soil disturbance addressed to change and shape the soil microbial communities network was stimulated. The supplementation of beneficial microbiota from compost into conducive soils represents a promising strategy for increasing suppression against soil-borne pathogens in view to search alternatives to synthetic chemicals. Soil microbiota plays a key role in crop protection improving natural soil suppressiveness. To limit inconsistencies, drawbacks and failures related to indiscriminate use of compost derived from feedstocks of different origin and composition, a detailed understanding of the microbial communities inhabitant the composts and their mechanisms of action in suppressing soil-borne pathogens have been elucidated in this paper overall in relation to role of soil organic matter. This review describes and discusses the main effects and impacts due to long-term application of disease-suppressive compost against soil-borne pathogens inducing soil microbiota change. The most reliable findings related to biocontrol-based microbiota have been discussed within a wider scenario regarding the agriculturally important microorganisms for sustainable agricultural productivity in a circular economy system. In particular, the role of the soil microbiota in plant health and productivity has been introduced in the first section of the paper. The key role of the compost microbiota explaining how a disease-suppressive compost can enhance soil suppressiveness has been recalled in the second section. The key roles of the soil organic matter, soil microbial biomass and biodiversity as support of the microbial activity of disease-suppressive compost have been in-depth presented and discussed in the third section. The predictors of suppressiveness in compost-amended soils have been critically discussed in the fourth section. The different methodological approaches for characterizing compost microbiota have been compared in the fifth section. Concluding remarks were drawn in the last section overall as to support the future research directions.

Disease-suppressive compost enhances natural soil suppressiveness against soil-borne plant pathogens: A critical review

De Corato U.
2020

Abstract

Plant diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens have been recognized as a critical factor worldwide for plant health and productivity overall in intensive cropping systems characterized by low organic matter content and frequent soil tillage. Very important goals have been reached in soil microbiota manipulation using organic amendment based on disease-suppressive compost where a specific soil disturbance addressed to change and shape the soil microbial communities network was stimulated. The supplementation of beneficial microbiota from compost into conducive soils represents a promising strategy for increasing suppression against soil-borne pathogens in view to search alternatives to synthetic chemicals. Soil microbiota plays a key role in crop protection improving natural soil suppressiveness. To limit inconsistencies, drawbacks and failures related to indiscriminate use of compost derived from feedstocks of different origin and composition, a detailed understanding of the microbial communities inhabitant the composts and their mechanisms of action in suppressing soil-borne pathogens have been elucidated in this paper overall in relation to role of soil organic matter. This review describes and discusses the main effects and impacts due to long-term application of disease-suppressive compost against soil-borne pathogens inducing soil microbiota change. The most reliable findings related to biocontrol-based microbiota have been discussed within a wider scenario regarding the agriculturally important microorganisms for sustainable agricultural productivity in a circular economy system. In particular, the role of the soil microbiota in plant health and productivity has been introduced in the first section of the paper. The key role of the compost microbiota explaining how a disease-suppressive compost can enhance soil suppressiveness has been recalled in the second section. The key roles of the soil organic matter, soil microbial biomass and biodiversity as support of the microbial activity of disease-suppressive compost have been in-depth presented and discussed in the third section. The predictors of suppressiveness in compost-amended soils have been critically discussed in the fourth section. The different methodological approaches for characterizing compost microbiota have been compared in the fifth section. Concluding remarks were drawn in the last section overall as to support the future research directions.
Biocontrol agent
Organic agriculture
Plant disease suppression
Soil microbiota manipulation
Sustainable agricultural productivity
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/55583
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