GRB 190114C represents a breakthrough for the physics of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), being the first GRB with delayed emission above 300 GeV, as reported by MAGIC. We present in this paper the sub-MeV/MeV data of the prompt and early afterglow emissions of GRB 190114C, as detected by AGILE and Konus-Wind, in the 20 keV-100 MeV energy range. The first stages of the burst exhibit multiple emission components, associated with an interesting spectral evolution. The first 2 s of the prompt emission can be described by a single "Band-like"spectral component. The successive 4 s show the presence of an additional high-energy spectral component, which quickly evolves into a "hard-flat"component of the νF ν spectrum, extending up to 10-100 MeV and likely produced by inverse Compton radiation, whose onset and evolution are clearly shown in our data. After this phase, the νF ν spectrum evolves into a "V shape,"showing the persistence and spectral hardening of the additional high-energy component in substantial agreement with Fermi and Swift results. We also analyze the first ∼200 s of the early afterglow that show a reflaring episode near T 0 + 15 s. We identify a new, so-far-unnoticed flux temporal break near T 0 + 100 s, which is detected in hard X-rays by both Konus-Wind and INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS. We find this break incompatible with the commonly assumed adiabatic evolution of a fireball in a constant-density medium. We interpret this break as a consequence of radiative evolution of the early afterglow from a fireball expanding in a wind-like circumburst medium.

AGILE and Konus-Wind Observations of GRB 190114C: The Remarkable Prompt and Early Afterglow Phases

Galli M.;
2020

Abstract

GRB 190114C represents a breakthrough for the physics of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), being the first GRB with delayed emission above 300 GeV, as reported by MAGIC. We present in this paper the sub-MeV/MeV data of the prompt and early afterglow emissions of GRB 190114C, as detected by AGILE and Konus-Wind, in the 20 keV-100 MeV energy range. The first stages of the burst exhibit multiple emission components, associated with an interesting spectral evolution. The first 2 s of the prompt emission can be described by a single "Band-like"spectral component. The successive 4 s show the presence of an additional high-energy spectral component, which quickly evolves into a "hard-flat"component of the νF ν spectrum, extending up to 10-100 MeV and likely produced by inverse Compton radiation, whose onset and evolution are clearly shown in our data. After this phase, the νF ν spectrum evolves into a "V shape,"showing the persistence and spectral hardening of the additional high-energy component in substantial agreement with Fermi and Swift results. We also analyze the first ∼200 s of the early afterglow that show a reflaring episode near T 0 + 15 s. We identify a new, so-far-unnoticed flux temporal break near T 0 + 100 s, which is detected in hard X-rays by both Konus-Wind and INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS. We find this break incompatible with the commonly assumed adiabatic evolution of a fireball in a constant-density medium. We interpret this break as a consequence of radiative evolution of the early afterglow from a fireball expanding in a wind-like circumburst medium.
Gamma-ray astronomy (628)
Gamma-ray bursts (629)
Gamma-ray transient sources (1853)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/56401
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