Advanced and innovative solutions are currently under investigations in order to solve the long-standing issues of materials constituting the breeding blanket of a future fusion reactor. Tritium permeation through steels, corrosion perpetrated by the breeding media, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects and intense neutron irradiation hinder the realization of this technology. Recently, the employment of protective nanoceramic coatings has been considered as one of the few viable solutions. In particular, the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique allows to produce dense, compact and uniform coatings, which are the fundamental characteristics when designing a protective barrier. Yttrium oxide (Y2O3) is one of the most promising candidates given its superior stability when facing lithium-based heavy liquid metals and also its low nuclear activation yield, thus it was selected as subject of study and characterzation. PLD-grown Y2O3 coatings were then tested in order to assess their feasability as protective barriers at blanket relevant conditions. Basic characterization of the as deposited and annealed (450 °C) films was perfomed (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscope, grazing incident angle x-rays diffraction, nanoindenation). A coated sample was also exposed to static Pb-16Li at.% for 1000 h, showing optimal corrosion resistance and thermal stability at high temperature (550 °C). Finally, the electrical resistivity of this material was measured (up to 200 °C) in order to evaluate its ability to mitigate the MHD detrimental effects. To conclude, a preliminary characterization of the PLD-grown Y2O3 coatings proved the possibility to employ them as multifunctional protective barrier to enable the accomplishment of the breeding blanket technology.

Design of a PLD-grown Y2O3protective barrier for fusion relevant applications

Bassini S.;Utili M.;
2020

Abstract

Advanced and innovative solutions are currently under investigations in order to solve the long-standing issues of materials constituting the breeding blanket of a future fusion reactor. Tritium permeation through steels, corrosion perpetrated by the breeding media, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects and intense neutron irradiation hinder the realization of this technology. Recently, the employment of protective nanoceramic coatings has been considered as one of the few viable solutions. In particular, the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique allows to produce dense, compact and uniform coatings, which are the fundamental characteristics when designing a protective barrier. Yttrium oxide (Y2O3) is one of the most promising candidates given its superior stability when facing lithium-based heavy liquid metals and also its low nuclear activation yield, thus it was selected as subject of study and characterzation. PLD-grown Y2O3 coatings were then tested in order to assess their feasability as protective barriers at blanket relevant conditions. Basic characterization of the as deposited and annealed (450 °C) films was perfomed (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscope, grazing incident angle x-rays diffraction, nanoindenation). A coated sample was also exposed to static Pb-16Li at.% for 1000 h, showing optimal corrosion resistance and thermal stability at high temperature (550 °C). Finally, the electrical resistivity of this material was measured (up to 200 °C) in order to evaluate its ability to mitigate the MHD detrimental effects. To conclude, a preliminary characterization of the PLD-grown Y2O3 coatings proved the possibility to employ them as multifunctional protective barrier to enable the accomplishment of the breeding blanket technology.
breeding blanket
DEMO
fusion reactor
protective barrier
pulsed laser deposition
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/56947
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