Neutron-based experimental techniques have been continuously improved, refined and strengthened since the pioneering experiments conducted by Clifford Shull and Bertram Brockhouse in the mid twentieth century. The possibility to reveal structure and dynamics at different scales of distances and times, provided a deep insight into the microscopic nature of condensed matter systems. The advent of scattering techniques, firmly linked to instrument development (diffractometers, spectrometers), made neutron science attractive for scientists working in different fields, such as physics, biology, chemistry and engineering. Together with the development of intense sources and sophisticated instruments, the role of neutron detection techniques is instrumental for an effective use of the intense fluxes of neutron beams that became available in the last three decades. Detectors are then essential for the development of new and effective instrumentation that in turn can trigger new ideas for science. Neutrons made available at large scale facilities extend from ultra-cold to fast neutrons. Sources providing monochromatic fast neutron beams, such as DD or DT sources (also in the form of portable devices) are used for many applications, including at industrial level. Thus, the unique properties of neutrons in terms of their interaction with matter are related to the extended range of energies or (equivalently) wavelengths over which they can be produced at both compact and/or large scales facilities. The scope of this review is, starting from the main physical mechanism for neutron detection, to provide a survey on well assessed and newly developed neutron detection systems using both passive and active methods and their applications. It will provide an overview of the current state of neutron detection by describing different approaches and pointing out open problems to be faced.

Neutron detection techniques from μeV to GeV

Pietropaolo A.;Angelone M.;Pillon M.;
2020

Abstract

Neutron-based experimental techniques have been continuously improved, refined and strengthened since the pioneering experiments conducted by Clifford Shull and Bertram Brockhouse in the mid twentieth century. The possibility to reveal structure and dynamics at different scales of distances and times, provided a deep insight into the microscopic nature of condensed matter systems. The advent of scattering techniques, firmly linked to instrument development (diffractometers, spectrometers), made neutron science attractive for scientists working in different fields, such as physics, biology, chemistry and engineering. Together with the development of intense sources and sophisticated instruments, the role of neutron detection techniques is instrumental for an effective use of the intense fluxes of neutron beams that became available in the last three decades. Detectors are then essential for the development of new and effective instrumentation that in turn can trigger new ideas for science. Neutrons made available at large scale facilities extend from ultra-cold to fast neutrons. Sources providing monochromatic fast neutron beams, such as DD or DT sources (also in the form of portable devices) are used for many applications, including at industrial level. Thus, the unique properties of neutrons in terms of their interaction with matter are related to the extended range of energies or (equivalently) wavelengths over which they can be produced at both compact and/or large scales facilities. The scope of this review is, starting from the main physical mechanism for neutron detection, to provide a survey on well assessed and newly developed neutron detection systems using both passive and active methods and their applications. It will provide an overview of the current state of neutron detection by describing different approaches and pointing out open problems to be faced.
Neutron applications
Neutron detectors
Passive and active neutron detection techniques
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/57093
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