The possibility of a pyrolysis process as a mean of recycling the residual plastic rich fraction (WEEE residue) derived from of a material recovery facility has been evaluated. The unknown product composition of WEEE residue has been supposed through coupled thermal – infrared analysis and ultimate analysis and resulted as PP 3 wt%, PBT 3 wt%, PVC 4 wt%, styrene-based polymers (principally ABS) 50 wt%, thermosetting resins (principally, epoxy/phenolic resins) 24 wt%, inorganic fraction (principally fiber glass) 16 wt%. DSC experiments showed that the overall energy, defined as the degradation heat, needed in order to completely degrade WEEE residue was about 4% of the exploitable energy of the input material. The effect of temperature and different zeolite catalysts were investigated, in particular in terms of yield and quality of the produced oils during the pyrolysis process. Produced oils were potentially exploitable as fuels and almost all catalysts improved their quality. The best performance was reached by NaUSY(5.7) with the second highest production of light oil and the greatest total monoaromatics yield, plus 12 wt% in comparison to thermal pyrolysis experiments. Furthermore, light oil produced by NaUSY(5.7) has one of the best LHV (36 MJ/kg) and no halogenated compounds were detected by GC–MS analysis. Char or pyrolytic gas combustion could supply the energy required for the thermal degradation of WEEE Residue.

Valorization of the plastic residue from a WEEE treatment plant by pyrolysis

Cafiero L.;De Angelis D.;Tuffi R.;
2020

Abstract

The possibility of a pyrolysis process as a mean of recycling the residual plastic rich fraction (WEEE residue) derived from of a material recovery facility has been evaluated. The unknown product composition of WEEE residue has been supposed through coupled thermal – infrared analysis and ultimate analysis and resulted as PP 3 wt%, PBT 3 wt%, PVC 4 wt%, styrene-based polymers (principally ABS) 50 wt%, thermosetting resins (principally, epoxy/phenolic resins) 24 wt%, inorganic fraction (principally fiber glass) 16 wt%. DSC experiments showed that the overall energy, defined as the degradation heat, needed in order to completely degrade WEEE residue was about 4% of the exploitable energy of the input material. The effect of temperature and different zeolite catalysts were investigated, in particular in terms of yield and quality of the produced oils during the pyrolysis process. Produced oils were potentially exploitable as fuels and almost all catalysts improved their quality. The best performance was reached by NaUSY(5.7) with the second highest production of light oil and the greatest total monoaromatics yield, plus 12 wt% in comparison to thermal pyrolysis experiments. Furthermore, light oil produced by NaUSY(5.7) has one of the best LHV (36 MJ/kg) and no halogenated compounds were detected by GC–MS analysis. Char or pyrolytic gas combustion could supply the energy required for the thermal degradation of WEEE Residue.
Degradation heat
Monoaromatics yield
Oil
Pyrolysis
WEEE plastics
Zeolitic catalysts
Polystyrenes
Pyrolysis
Recycling
Electronic Waste
Plastics
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/57521
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