The expected imminent widespread use of electromobility in transport systems draws attention to the possible effects of human exposure to magnetic fields generated inside electric vehicles and during their recharge. The current trend is to increase the capacity of the battery inside the vehicles to extend the available driving range and to increase the power of recharging columns to reduce the time required for a full recharge. This leads to higher currents and potentially stronger magnetic fields. The Interoperability Center of the Joint Research Center started an experimental activity focused on the assessment of low-frequency magnetic fields emitted by five fast-charging devices available on the market in recharge and standby conditions. The aim of this study was to contribute to the development of a standard measurement procedure for the assessment of magnetic fields emitted by direct current charging columns. The spectrum and amplitudes of the magnetic field, as well as exposure indices according to guidelines for the general public and occupational exposure, were recorded by means of a magnetic field probe analyzer. The worst-case scenario for instantaneous physical direct and indirect effects was identified. Measurements within the frequency range of 25 Hz–2 kHz revealed localized magnetic flux density peaks above 100 μT at the 50 Hz frequency in three out of five chargers, registered in close proximity during the recharge. Beyond this distance, exposure indices were recorded showing values below 50% of reference levels. Bioelectromagnetics. 2020;41:308–317 © 2020 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Assessment of Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields Emitted by DC Fast Charging Columns

Pinto R.;
2020

Abstract

The expected imminent widespread use of electromobility in transport systems draws attention to the possible effects of human exposure to magnetic fields generated inside electric vehicles and during their recharge. The current trend is to increase the capacity of the battery inside the vehicles to extend the available driving range and to increase the power of recharging columns to reduce the time required for a full recharge. This leads to higher currents and potentially stronger magnetic fields. The Interoperability Center of the Joint Research Center started an experimental activity focused on the assessment of low-frequency magnetic fields emitted by five fast-charging devices available on the market in recharge and standby conditions. The aim of this study was to contribute to the development of a standard measurement procedure for the assessment of magnetic fields emitted by direct current charging columns. The spectrum and amplitudes of the magnetic field, as well as exposure indices according to guidelines for the general public and occupational exposure, were recorded by means of a magnetic field probe analyzer. The worst-case scenario for instantaneous physical direct and indirect effects was identified. Measurements within the frequency range of 25 Hz–2 kHz revealed localized magnetic flux density peaks above 100 μT at the 50 Hz frequency in three out of five chargers, registered in close proximity during the recharge. Beyond this distance, exposure indices were recorded showing values below 50% of reference levels. Bioelectromagnetics. 2020;41:308–317 © 2020 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
DC charging
e-mobility
fast charging
human electromagnetic field exposure
magnetic flux density
Automobiles
Electric Power Supplies
Electromagnetic Fields
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/58121
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