Power exhaust is a key mission in the roadmap to the realization of a future fusion reactor. Among the different solutions, the use of liquid metals as plasma facing materials are of interest due to their potential increased lifetime. Several liquid metal limiters have been successfully tested in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade over the last 10 years. Liquid materials such as lithium and tin have been investigated using capillary porous systems (CPSs), and their impact on plasma performance has been explored. From such experience, a liquid metal divertor (LMD) concept design, CPS-based, is here proposed. Tin has been preferred as plasma facing material. The proposed LMD would operate, in low evaporative regime, with matching heat exhausting capabilities to those of the baseline ITER-like divertor. Continuous refilling of the CPS is guaranteed with a reservoir at the back of the unit, where the metal is kept liquid through a gas heating circuit. The study has been carried out using ANSYS and the thermal results will be shown. All the design choices are compatible with the current materials and the constraints adopted for the DEMO W divertor. Using such configuration, thermal loads up to 20 MW/m2 are exhausted while keeping the surface temperature below 1250 °C. The design foresees values of pressure, temperature and flow rate of the water coolant in the same range expected for the W DEMO divertor, thus facilitating the integration of such solution in the current cassette design. Technological and practical aspects are addressed, i.e. tin corrosion and CPS wettability. Possible solutions to prevent tin corrosion, and its compatibility with structural materials, will be outlined.

CPS Based Liquid Metal Divertor Target for EU-DEMO

Roccella S.;de Luca R.;Mancini A.;Mazzitelli G.
2020

Abstract

Power exhaust is a key mission in the roadmap to the realization of a future fusion reactor. Among the different solutions, the use of liquid metals as plasma facing materials are of interest due to their potential increased lifetime. Several liquid metal limiters have been successfully tested in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade over the last 10 years. Liquid materials such as lithium and tin have been investigated using capillary porous systems (CPSs), and their impact on plasma performance has been explored. From such experience, a liquid metal divertor (LMD) concept design, CPS-based, is here proposed. Tin has been preferred as plasma facing material. The proposed LMD would operate, in low evaporative regime, with matching heat exhausting capabilities to those of the baseline ITER-like divertor. Continuous refilling of the CPS is guaranteed with a reservoir at the back of the unit, where the metal is kept liquid through a gas heating circuit. The study has been carried out using ANSYS and the thermal results will be shown. All the design choices are compatible with the current materials and the constraints adopted for the DEMO W divertor. Using such configuration, thermal loads up to 20 MW/m2 are exhausted while keeping the surface temperature below 1250 °C. The design foresees values of pressure, temperature and flow rate of the water coolant in the same range expected for the W DEMO divertor, thus facilitating the integration of such solution in the current cassette design. Technological and practical aspects are addressed, i.e. tin corrosion and CPS wettability. Possible solutions to prevent tin corrosion, and its compatibility with structural materials, will be outlined.
DEMO
Liquid metal divertor
Plasma facing component
Tin
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/58605
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