Lithium-ion batteries are a popular choice of power source for a variety of energy and power demanding applications for both stationary applications and electromobility. Among electrochemical storage systems, Lithium-ion batteries were found to be promising candidate, due to their high power and high energy density. In order to assemble high power batteries for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and pure electric vehicles, several hundreds of large-format Lithium-ion cells will be required, and even more cells for power/energy demanding stationary applications. However, safety remains a significant concern, as battery failure leads to ejection of hazardous materials and rapid heat release. The failure of a single cell can generate a large amount of heat which can then initiate, in the worst case, the thermal runaway of neighbouring cells, leading to failure throughout the battery pack. The heat accumulation can also run into the venting of a cell, with the emission of flammable organic solvent inside the battery pack. Battery failure can be initiated via a number of different abuse scenarios, such as overheating, overcharging, puncture/crushing, water immersion, or external short circuit. Development of effective mitigation strategies necessitates a study on battery failure events and a better understanding of important characteristics relating to safety, such as heat release, hazardous materials ejection, and thermal propagation. On the other hand, when a fire event is initiated, proper intervention strategies have to be defined in order to avoid it becoming catastrophic. In this paper are reported the results of thermal abuse tests on single Lithium-ion cells and a battery pack. The tests were performed with the technical equipment and resources of National Fire Corps. Screening tests for battery fire extinguishing agents were also performed. The effectiveness of an agent was evaluated through experiments on the cooling effect of fire extinguishing agents. Among the various agents, water and foam were found to be the most effective. Copyright © 2018, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l.

Effective fire extinguishing systems for lithium-ion battery

Morriello, I.;Di Bari, C.;Russo, P.
2018

Abstract

Lithium-ion batteries are a popular choice of power source for a variety of energy and power demanding applications for both stationary applications and electromobility. Among electrochemical storage systems, Lithium-ion batteries were found to be promising candidate, due to their high power and high energy density. In order to assemble high power batteries for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and pure electric vehicles, several hundreds of large-format Lithium-ion cells will be required, and even more cells for power/energy demanding stationary applications. However, safety remains a significant concern, as battery failure leads to ejection of hazardous materials and rapid heat release. The failure of a single cell can generate a large amount of heat which can then initiate, in the worst case, the thermal runaway of neighbouring cells, leading to failure throughout the battery pack. The heat accumulation can also run into the venting of a cell, with the emission of flammable organic solvent inside the battery pack. Battery failure can be initiated via a number of different abuse scenarios, such as overheating, overcharging, puncture/crushing, water immersion, or external short circuit. Development of effective mitigation strategies necessitates a study on battery failure events and a better understanding of important characteristics relating to safety, such as heat release, hazardous materials ejection, and thermal propagation. On the other hand, when a fire event is initiated, proper intervention strategies have to be defined in order to avoid it becoming catastrophic. In this paper are reported the results of thermal abuse tests on single Lithium-ion cells and a battery pack. The tests were performed with the technical equipment and resources of National Fire Corps. Screening tests for battery fire extinguishing agents were also performed. The effectiveness of an agent was evaluated through experiments on the cooling effect of fire extinguishing agents. Among the various agents, water and foam were found to be the most effective. Copyright © 2018, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12079/4608
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